Parashas Vayishlach

This week’s parashah recounts Yaakov’s encounter with Eisav upon returning to Eretz Yisrael. In Bereishis 32:14, the Torah says that Yaakov “took, from what came into his hand, an offering of tribute to his brother Eisav.” The question arises: What is the point behind the phrase “from what came into his hand”? This phrase seems completely superfluous. The Midrash presents various interpretations, some of which Rashi mentions. The Maggid offers an approach that explains easily the import of the added phrase.
The Maggid brings out his explanation through a discussion of the mitzvah of tithing flocks. In Vayikra 27:32-33, the Torah says that the herdsman is not supposed to select on his own which animals will be sanctified, but instead is supposed to make the animals pass under his staff, and designate every tenth one as sanctified. The Gemara in Bechoros 58b elaborates on the procedure, teaching that the herdsman is to place the flock in a corral with a narrow opening, let the animals through one by one, and tap every tenth one with a paint-daubed stick to mark it as sanctified. What is the reason for this specific method? Why is does it not suffice for the herdsman to select the required number of animals however he wishes, based on the size of his flock, and designate the selected animals as sanctified?
The Maggid answers this question by means of the following principle: Whenever any object in this world, even in the inanimate, plant, or animal domain, is linked to some aspect of sanctity, the object is thereby elevated. The Maggid illustrates this principle with examples.
He begins with two examples from the inanimate domain. The first example comes from the episode of Avraham’s purchase of a field and a cave from the men of Cheis to use as a burial site. In Bereishis 23:17-18, the Torah states that through this purchase the property was secured unto Avraham, with the Hebrew term for secured being ויקם, which literally means that the property arose. Thus, the Torah is indicating that when the property passed into the ownership of our holy forefather Avraham it was elevated. In this vein, Rashi’s commentary on this passage, quoting the Sages, states that through the purchase the property achieved תקומה – it became an enduring entity. The second example comes from the episode of Yaakov lying down to sleep in Beis El, as described at the beginning of parashas Vayeitzei. The Torah tells us that Yaakov laid his head on a stone. Our Sages teach that several stones vied for the privilege of being the one upon which our holy forefather Yaakov would lay his head. Ultimately, Yaakov merged the stones together to form a single stone on which he placed his head, and the entire merged stone was thereby elevated.
The Maggid then presents an example from the animal domain. Melachim Alef 18 describes the famous showdown between the prophet Eliyahu and the false prophets of the idol Baal. Eliyahu told the prophets of Baal to bring two bullocks, choose one that they would try to offer to Baal, and give him the other one to offer to Hashem. The Midrash states that all of the 450 prophets of Baal who were present tried together to push the bullock they chose for Baal to get it to move, but the bullock did not budge until Eliyahu told it that, it, too, would be part of the sanctification of Hashem’s Name that was about to take place.
In view of the foregoing principle, the Maggid says, we can easily understand the reason behind the procedure for tithing flocks. Hashem did not want to put into the hands of the herdsman himself, with his limited human understanding, the momentous decision of which animals would be elevated by being invested with the sanctity of a tithe. With voluntary offerings (nedarim and nedavos), the initiative to bring the offering comes from the herdsman, so Hashem allows him to choose which animal to bring. But the tithe is an offering that Hashem demands, and so He insists on a process that puts in His hands the choice of which animals will be brought.
Similarly, when Yaakov was preparing the gifts for Eisav, he faced the issue of which animals would be removed from his holy sphere of influence and placed in the possession of his despicable brother. He knew he could not make this momentous choice himself. So he set up an automatic selection system of some sort, along the lines of that used for tithing, and whatever animals came into his hand through this system were the ones he gave to Eisav.
David Zucker, Site Administrator

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